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435 Gwinnett educators retire

435 Gwinnett educators retire

GWINNETT COUNTY, Ga. -- Now that the school year has ended, Gwinnett County Public Schools officials are prepared to honor the 435 district employees who will retire this year.

The retirees dedicated a collective 11,233 years of their lives to teaching. They served in several capacities -- in the classroom, on the bus, behind the counter in school shops, and so on.

"I would like to personally thank each of our retiring employees for their service to Gwinnett County Public Schools, to our community, and most importantly to our students," GCPS Superintendent J. Alvin Wilbanks said in a statement. "Each and every one of these individuals made a difference through their contributions. While they are closing a chapter in their lives, their legacy will continue as our school system builds on all that they have accomplished to serve students next year and in the years to come."

As Students End School Year, Boys & Girls Clubs Offers Way to Fight “Summer Brain Drain"

ATLANTA -- This month, millions of kids begin their summer breaks, looking forward to vacations, pool time and carefree days. But studies and experience show a lack of mental stimulation causes them to unlearn much of what they were taught over the school year.  Boys & Girls Clubs across the country offer young people a safe, exciting place to spend their summer months, with staff and resources to fight the effects of this “Summer Brain Drain.”

The reality for today’s kids is that many will find themselves with few structured activities, caregivers who are working all day, and too much unsupervised television, video game and computer time.

President Touts Concerns Over Summer Learning

Also known as “summer learning loss” or the “summer slide,” this issue is a growing problem for American children.  In 2010, President Obama noted, “Students are losing a lot of what they learn during the school year during the summer.”

11 Gwinnett students named Gates Millennium Scholars

11 Gwinnett students named Gates Millennium Scholars

GWINNETT COUNTY, Ga. -- Eleven graduating seniors in Gwinnett County public schools have been named 2012 Gates Millennium Scholars.

The prestigious Gates Millennium Scholarship, which is funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, pays full college tuition, room and board for some of the country's most promising young people. Only 1,000 students earn the scholarship every school year.

This year's Gates Millennium Scholars from Gwinnett County include:

Collins Hill High School
Vivek Kamlesh Patel
Will attend the University of Georgia
Major: Pre-medicine

Gwinnett School of Mathematics, Science, and Technology
Arsalan Akkas Sufi
Will attend Yale University
Major: Undecided

Meadowcreek High School
Alex Shaun Steele
Will attend the University of Georgia
Major: Computer engineering

When does the school year end?

When does the school year end?

LAWRENCEVILLE, Ga. -- The last day of school is right around the corner for Gwinnett County students.

Public schools will dismiss for the summer on Wednesday, May 23.

Buford City Schools, meanwhile, will end the school year two days later -- Friday, May 25.

The last days of school in other metro Atlanta districts are staggered throughout the second half of May. They include:

Wednesday, May 16
Clarke County

Thursday, May 17
Hall County

Friday, May 18
Bartow County
Clayton County
Fulton County

Tuesday, May 22
Atlanta Public Schools
Barrow County

Wednesday, May 23
Carroll County
Newton County

Thursday, May 24
Cobb County
Decatur City Schools
DeKalb County
Rockdale County

Ga. high school students take longer to earn diplomas

ATLANTA -- A new method of calculating graduation rates reveals that more high school students are dropping out than had been previously counted and some of them are taking five or even six years to earn a diploma.

According to reports the new formula was released last week. It shows that Georgia's 2011 graduation rate dropped 13 percentage points using the calculation, to 67.4 percent.

RELATED | Compare graduation rates by school

Nearly 90 metro Atlanta schools near bottom of barrel

Nearly 90 metro Atlanta schools near bottom of barrel

ATLANTA -- The Georgia Department of Education has released a list of 156 schools labeled as "focus" schools under the state's new accountability system.

The schools, many of which are in metro Atlanta, are one step above the state's worst performing schools, called "priority" schools, which were released last week. The "focus" schools are ones with a graduation rate of less than 60 percent over two years or have large gaps between the highest and lowest achieving subgroup of students on campus.

Subgroups can be determined by race, special needs and family income.

The state was one of 10 to win waivers last month from the federal No Child Left Behind law.

Bill would revoke bonuses for teachers caught cheating

Bill would revoke bonuses for teachers caught cheating

ATLANTA -- A Senate committee has passed a bill that would revoke bonuses for Georgia teachers who cheat on standardized tests.

The Democratic-backed legislation was approved unanimously by the Senate education committee Monday. It now goes to the full Senate for a vote before heading to the governor's desk.

Under current policy, teachers can receive bonuses or incentive pay based on the standardized test scores of their students.

The bill stems from last year's cheating scandal in Atlanta Public Schools.

A state investigation in July revealed widespread cheating by educators in nearly half of the Atlanta's 100 schools dating to 2001. In all, nearly 180 teachers and principals were accused of giving answers to students or changing responses once the tests had been completed.